Monitor Heater Error Codes [2 Easy Solutions]

The most common MPI Monitor kerosene heater error codes are error code 13 and error code 14. We’ll take a look at what the error codes mean and how to get rid of them in this article. Keep scrolling to know all you need to and remove your Monitor heater error codes ASAP.

Monitor Heater Error Codes [2 Easy Solutions]

In this section, we’ll break down each of the MPI monitor heater error codes displayed often on monitor heaters. Then, we’ll discuss what you should do to fix these common Monitor 2400 heater problems. The solutions work for other Monitor Kerosene heaters as well.

Monitor Heater Error Code 13

Monitor heater error code 13 can mean several things. The error code will show up in each of the following cases.

Reason 1: Ignitor, solenoid pump, or circuit board failure

Reason 2: Flame rod and burner parts touching each other or incorrect wiring

Reason 3: Overheat or air pressure switch is open

Here’s how you can get rid of Monitor heater error code 13 for each of these reasons. 

Solution For Reason 1:

You’ll need to test the ignitor and solenoid pump with a multimeter to see whether there is an issue with them. If the inducer motor runs but the igniter doesn’t glow, your monitor heater won’t ignite. Here the igniter most likely is behind the error cord 13 culprit.

When you find the malfunctioning part you’ll need to replace it with a new one. In case the circuit board is the problem, you’ll need to get a professional to repair the circuit board or replace it if needed.

Here’s how you can test and replace your ignitor. you’ll need a hot surface igniter a screwdriver or a nut driver.

Step 1: When working on your furnace, always shut off the power and close the gas valve. Remove the top cover panel. Your heater can use push-lock, twist-lock, require a screwdriver, or socket wrench.

Step 2: Trace the gas line up to the burners. Check your manual to see where the ignitor should be. In some heaters, it’ll be hidden behind a cover. Now disconnect the wires. Next, unscrew and remove the igniter but be careful not to touch the element.

Step 3:Take the multimeter and set it to the lowest Ohms of resistance. Now touch the probes to each terminal. If the igniter has continuity, your multimeter should read anywhere from 30 to 200 ohms. If there is no reading on the multimeter or just a slight change, then there is no continuity and you will have to replace the igniter.

Step 4: Align the new igniter and tighten the screw now reconnect the wires we placed on the upper cover. 

Step 5: Next, open the gas well. Now turn on the power to your furnace. The furnace should be running normally.

Solution For Reason 2:

Clean the flame rod carefully and make sure there are no loose connections. Check the exhaust flue for any blockage. Remove any debris in the 1/2 mm oil line that runs between the oil pump and the burner pot. After doing all of that, if your unit isn’t running properly, get a professional to service your heater.

Solution For Reason 3: 

Rewiring the pressure switch to fix the error code is a very bad idea. You want the furnace to shut off if there’s a serious lack of air before it overheats and risks a housefire. 

First, clean the contacts and see if that solves the issue.

You could take the hose off the draft inducer motor sack and blow through the hose and see if the pressure switch clicks. This could unstick the mechanism. Another way to clean is to take the hose off the switch and wiggle a paperclip end around the floor to clean it.

Try cleaning the switch or tubing that supplies air to the switch, power cycling the furnace to reset the control board, and then turning the furnace back on. 

If that doesn’t fix the issue, listen to see if the inducer motor turns on. If it doesn’t turn on when the furnace gets a call for heat. That’s why this switch is stuck open because it closes when the inducer motor turns on. You’ll need to fic the blower motor in that case.

But if the motor turns on and the switch doesn’t flip, then you know the problem is the switch or the control board. You’ll need a licensed electrician to take a look at your heater at this point.

Monitor Heater Error Code 14

Error code 14 will show up on your display when the flame goes out when the heater has been running. There can be a few possible reasons behind this problem. 

  • Insufficient fuel supply
  • Blocked fuel flow
  • Lack of combustible air
  • Dirt in the flame rod
  • Loose burner mat
  • Warped burner ring
  • Carbon deposits
  • Overheating due to dirty fan cage

Solution:

Turn the heater gas supply and power off. Start with cleaning the fan cage. Hear for a clicking or thumping sound coming from the fuel pump. This sound means that there isn’t enough fuel for the flame to keep burning.

If you hear the sound, check the fuel filter of your heater and the fuel strainer in the fuel pump. When you remove the fuel strainer, kerosene will come out of it. You should have a rag at hand to absorb the fuel. Before cleaning the strainer, ensure that the fuel barrel valve is closed. 

Remove the front cover of your heater with a screwdriver. Also, take off the grill. Your heater’s flame rod should be next to the burner window. It’s held by two screws and one wire goes into it.

You need to clean the soot and carbon on the flame rod with steel wool or sandpaper.  The gasket is delicate. You need to be cautious or you may damage it.

If your heater isn’t running normally after doing all of these, you should get a professional to take a look.

FAQs

Are monitor heaters still being made?

No, monitor heaters are no longer in production. The heaters were manufactured by the famous Japanese company, Hitachi. They decided to stop manufacturing Monitor heaters after 2014. Hitachi did honor the warranties before closing shop.

Can I use diesel fuel in my monitor heater?

Many people do use diesel instead of kerosene in their Monitor heater. However, diesel has a higher flashing point than kerosene which means it won’t burn as cleanly.

There is a high chance, the heater running on diesel will stink up the place. So make sure you have great ventilation before using diesel in your Monitor kerosene heater.

Is #1 diesel fuel the same as kerosene?

Yes. Kerosene is also called #1 diesel fuel.

What burns hotter kerosene or diesel?

Kerosene will burn hotter than diesel as it has a lower viscosity. 

Does diesel expire?

Yes, diesel does expire. It has an average shelf life of 6-12 months if stored properly. Without proper storage, diesel will degrade sooner.

Conclusion

Hopefully, our guide has helped you get rid of your Monitor heater error codes. We’d love to help you out with any questions you may have. Leave a comment below and you’ll hear from us soon.

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